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#askdrdeepa #bestdietician #weightlosshyderabadCarbohydrates and weight loss facts : The problem is not "carbs", it is carbs in a certain form or combination with fat. Saturated fat hurts insulin sensitivity while polyunsaturated fat increases it. The problem is when saturated fat is combined with carbs, because then the saturated fat is immediately deposited in the liver, and subsequently the pancreas. Once the liver is so fatty that it starts to be stored in the pancreas, then you have type 2diabetes.When one eats only fats/protein, there is no insulin spike large enough to deposit the saturated fat into the liver. When one eats only carbs (whole food carbs with vitamins and fiber, like fruit) the carbs do cause an insulin spike but the vitamins mitigate liver fat storage and the fat generated from the carbs are stored throughout the body.The problem is when these are mixed, as that never happens in nature. When mixed, as the absorbed food first gets to the liver, the insulin spike from the carbs stores the saturated fat already there from the food. Thus, eating potato chips and soda is the worst, just soda is a little better, and just chips is a little better still.I won't say that drinking fruit juice won't deposit saturated fat in your liver, because it will, but not all carbs are created equal, as you said.There are the carb-high foods, and the fat/protein high foods. These are the two major calorically dense types in nature. The fat/protein foods take longer to digest and initiate release of bile from the gallbladder. Carb-rich foods do not and are digested faster. The problem, as I've said is actually unnatural meals. The processed carbs or carbs mixed with fat are what does it.Furthermore, many studies show that meat consumption is directly related to diabetes risk. This is perhaps due to the inflammation caused by meat to the liver, preventing insulin sensitivity. This is not terrible on it's own, but mixing in carbs we now have a problem. Thus the "hamburger and soda" combo is terrible, but you can't just say "carbs are bad", because there are obviously foods with carbs that are very good for you.The fact that it has been shown that eating a fruit rich diet can cure diabetes, just like a carbless diet can, means that it is not carbs themselves which cause the problem, as you elude, the problem is how those carbs are delivered and what they are mixed with, so, you are certainly being misleading with what you said.There are many paradigms of diets that can cure diabetes. One is a keto diet, one is a whole food high carb diet. That's just how it is, because as animals, we either eat one or the other. Animals don't mix foods, and we don't process them, and that's just how nature works. Please don't say "carbs" are the problem, because obviously billions of people eat carbs on this planet, and we have for millions of years.
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Q: Why does my weight fluctuate so much from morning till evening?Answer:Ever so often, patients come to me, saying: “I’ve tried several strict diet programmes and yet things go wrong. After all the hard work and effort I put in with diet and exercise, my weight doesn’t budge. In fact, there are days when my weight increases by 1-2kg by the end of the day!”It’s hard not to worry when you see the scale jump a kilo or two overnight or, worse, the same day. What you need to understand, however, is that there is no need to. Such weight fluctuations in a day can mean any of the following things:Water retentionSince most of us can’t eat so much in a day or two that we actually gain a couple of kilos a day, a dramatic increase in weight could be due to water retention. Eating, drinking, urinating, bowel movements, exercise—everything can affect your body’s water composition and, therefore, weight. For example, high-carb and high-salt foods lead to water retention and an increase in weight. If you exercise regularly and an excess of salt is a one-off thing, you can lose the weight. But if you consume too much salt regularly, your body holds on to the water to get that balance back; this translates to weight gain. Conversely, if you suddenly pretty much stop consuming sodium, you will release water—this, in turn, will result in weight loss. But this weight loss is only temporary since your body adjusts to the new levels of sodium accordingly via the hormone aldosterone (a steroid hormone made by the adrenal glands; its main role is to regulate salt and water in the body). This is important to note, because a lot of people go “off salt” in the attempt to lose weight. However, it only leaves them feeling giddy and sick.Carbs intakeThe amount of carbs you consume can also explain the varying number on the scale. For every gram of carbohydrate that your body stores via glycogen, it stores three grams of water.Switching to a low-carb diet, therefore, often leads to rapid weight loss, but it is not fat you’re losing, it’s the body using up the stored glycogen for energy, which causes less water to be retained, thus leading to weight loss.Menstrual bloat Women tend to retain water during their menstrual cycle owing to hormonal fluctuations. For this reason, it’s best for women not to weigh themselves during their menstrual cycle. Alcohol Alcohol is a diuretic and causes dehydration in the body, which leads to water retention. Strength training Lifting weights or doing body-weight exercises can cause trauma to muscle tissue. This is how the muscle rebuilds itself and makes one stronger and more toned. But in order to rebuild the muscle fibre, your muscles retain water to help speed up the process in the cells. So you may see your weight go northwards. Bathroom visitsIf you cannot use the toilet regularly during the day and then decide to weigh yourself, you may notice a half to one-and-a-half kilogram of weight gain.Long-distance travelThis can also cause fluid retention and dehydration. Drinking alcohol on flights worsens the problem. 
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Question: I consume a very low cost diet. The diet is 65% carbs, all from white wheat flour. If I stay physically fit and don't gain any weight, will this increase my risk of diabetes? In other words, the glycemic load is very high for every meal. The daily allowances, carbs-fats-proteins, and omegas are all good.Answer: Diabetes starts with muscular and liver insulin resistance, where evidence overwhelmingly implicates intracellular long-chain saturated fat accumulation and inflammation/innate immune response. Obesity (which increases free fatty acids & inflammation), dietary long chain saturated fatty acids and dietary fructose (from added sugars, which increase small intestinal dysbiosis and induce liver fat synthesis) are all strongly linked, and with plausible mechanisms. Diabetes is rare where traditional diets are consumed in developing nations and was rare in 19th century European/American populations, indicating high starch diets (75%+ carbs), when consumed with few long chain saturated fats or added sugars, and in slender populations, pose little risk. I would expect no acute issues with wheat in non-celiacs, indeed the arabinoxylans are an important prebiotic that feeds beneficial gut microbiota and improves gut barrier function. However, the arabinoxylans are largely in the bran. I would strongly discourage a refined flour diet of leavened bread, and encourage alternate forms, like whole wheat pasta and cracked wheat/bulghur. These are also better forms for those with insulin resistance or diabetes, as pasta & whole grains have much lower glycemic indices.Refined grains (flour) of any type are going to cause issues. Far more than other carbs. Rice is certainly better than wheat flour. So are oats and potatoes. Collectively, they are still a lot of carbs. I get that you want to keep cost down. Fats and protein don't have to be expensive if you shop around. Beans and eggs are generally good options.#diabetesdiet#nutritionanddiabetes#drdeepabestdietician
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